AGENDA

TUESDAY | 13 OCTOBER 2015

08:30 – 09:30 Registration

09:30 – 09:45 Conference Opening

09:45 – 11:30 High Level Panel “Business as a Force for Good: The Role of Companies in Sustainable Development in Europe and Worldwide”

Business as a Force for Good: The Role of Companies in Sustainable Development in Europe and Worldwide #GC15SDG

In September 2015, governments decide on the Sustainable Development Goals, the SDG, replacing and continuing the Millennium Development Goals. This 2030 global agenda for sustainable development outlines and specifies the major challenges for humanity and provides a comprehensive set of goals and concrete targets aiming at solving these challenges. A central pillar of this undertaking is the partnership approach for implementing the agenda: the goals can only be reached with the participation of all countries, all stakeholders and all people. This shared responsibility explicitly includes the companies around the world.

The panel, jointly organized by the German Sustainability Council and the German Global Compact Network strives to shed light into the future role business can and has to play in sustainable development: what are the expectations of different stakeholders, what are promising approaches and what are conducive framework conditions in this regard? The panel will set the scene for the conference and the 16 Break-Out Sessions that will in turn address the particular aspects of corporate sustainability contributing to the 2030-Agenda.

Impulse: „15 years Global Compact and the evolving role of business in sustainable development“ by Sir Mark Moody-Stuart (Chairman Foundation for the Global Compact)

Impulse: „The Sustainable Development Goals as a Roadmap for Business“ by Lise Kingo (Executive Director, UN Global Compact)

Panel:

  • Pierre-Oliver Bandet (Vice President, Air France KLM)
  • Stefan Crets (Executive Director, CSR Europe)
  • Isabel Garro Hernandez (Chair Local Networks Advisory Group, Director Global Compact Network Spain)
  • Klaus Milke (Chairman of the Board, Germanwatch)
  • Lars Castellucci (Member of the German Federal Parliament for the SPD)

Moderator: Lucia Reisch (German Sustainability Council)

11:30 – 11:40 Introduction to Break-Out Sessions

12:00 – 13:30 Break-Out Sessions

BO 01: Business Partner Compliance - The Importance of Effective Third Party Due Diligence (Room Vilnius)

Business Partner Compliance – The Importance of Effective Third Party Due Diligence (Room Vilnius)

Background & Goal

Business regulations are increasing worldwide and due to the high level of economic interdependence companies are facing legal risks when conducting business. Due diligence obligations on third parties become more and more important and companies have to check details on transactions and keep track of their business partners to avoid the risk that third parties pay bribes on their behalf. If they fail to do so they are in danger of offending the international anti-corruption legislation, e.g. FCPA, UK Bribery Act, Brazilian Clean Company Act, etc.

Specific goal of the workshop is to inform about possible due diligence tools and to discuss how these can be implemented to mitigate corruption risks.

Who should attend?

This session is open to companies of any size and sector wishing to learn and enhance their understanding of business partner compliance as well as interested representatives from other organizations and institutions.

Organizers: Alliance for Integrity (AfIn), Deutsches Institut für Compliance (German Institute for Compliance, DICO), Global Compact Network Spain

Speakers: Andrew Copland-Cale (Siemens), Isabel Garro (Global Compact Network Spain), Dr. Rainer Markfort (Dentons; DICO), Anders Rune (Transparency International UK)

Moderator: Noor Naqschbandi (Alliance for Integrity)

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BO 02: Current Challenges in Supply Chain Sustainability: Best Practice Examples and Innovation (Room Moskau)

Current Challenges in Supply Chain Sustainability: Best Practice Examples and Innovation (Room Moskau)

A company’s entire supply chain can make a significant impact in promoting human rights, fair labour practices, environmental progress and anti-corruption policies. However, UN Global Compact participants rank supply chain practices as the biggest challenge to improving their sustainability performance. Extending the UN Global Compact’s 10 Principles into the supply chain can be difficult because of the scale and complexity of many supply chains.

The aim of this break-out session is to present examples of how UN Global Compact signatories face some of the most pressing challenges in implementing supply chain sustainability.

These range from

  • strategically incorporating sustainable procurement into all business processes, to
  • cooperating with peers in the automotive industry in order to mainstream sustainability in the sector, to
  • implementing innovative solutions with SME suppliers in the challenging environment of developing countries.

Organizers: GIZ, CSR Europe

Speakers: Ferdinand Geckeler (BMW), Constanze Helmchen (GIZ), Boris Rafalski (Unilever)

Moderator: Stefan Crets (CSR Europe)

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BO 03: Risks and Chances in the Digital Age – The Right to Privacy as a Business Case (Room Tallinn)

Risks and Chances in the Digital Age – The Right to Privacy as a Business Case (Room Tallinn)

All over the world companies in the Information & Communications Technology sector face challenges that may conflict with the internationally recognized human rights of freedom of expression and privacy.

Questions that arise are, among others:

  • What is the business case for “privacy”? Can companies create market advantages by assuring user trust?
  • How can companies approach questions of risk assessment and mitigation in complex political settings?
  • What are the ethical and legal dilemmas that companies have to deal with when they hold customers data? And how can these be navigated by companies?
  • How far can customer consent take us? What are the uses and limits of this approach to data privacy?

Organizers:  Institute for Human Rights and Business (IHRB), Business & Human Rights Resource Center (B&HRRC), Global Compact Network Germany

Speakers: Dan Bross (Microsoft), John Morrison (IHRB), Yves Nissim (Orange), Thomas Kahler (ING-DiBa)

Moderation: Stephanie Hankey (Tactical Tech)

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BO 04: Shifting the Portfolio towards Sustainability – Approaches, Tools and Experiences (Room Asgabat)

Shifting the Portfolio towards Sustainability – Approaches, Tools and Experiences (Room Asgabat)

In order to meet customers’ and stakeholders’ demands for more sustainable solutions, companies have been developing approaches and methodologies to assess their existing portfolios’ sustainability, drive their product and innovation strategy, and expand their sustainable product offerings. In doing so, decision makers must consider a host of factors and megatrends that will influence and affect their companies over the short, medium and long terms. They include climate change, resource scarcity, a growing global middle class that is increasingly city-based, a society that is more digitally connected than ever before and a technology revolution that is disrupting traditional business models and methods of production at a rate not seen before. Against this background the session will address challenges and advantages of steering a companies’ portfolio applying sustainability criteria to all products and services.

Organizers: BASF

Speakers: Andreas Kicherer (BASF), Vidar Gundersen (Biomar Norway), Andrea Brown (WBCSD)

Moderator: Michael Werner (Scholz & Friends)

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13:30 – 14:45 Lunch Break & Marketplace

14:45 – 16:15 Break-Out Sessions

BO 05: Climate Session 1: Business Targets and Strategies for the 2 Degrees Goal (Room Asgabat)

Climate Session 1: Business Targets and Strategies for the 2 Degrees Goal (Room Asgabat)

What are we talking about?

In the run-up to COP21 in December 2015 governments will very probably re-emphasize the 2 degree goal underpinning stronger climate commitments at national level. Many companies have already defined short- and medium-term reduction targets with a reach up to 2020. These reduction targets will usually be met by efficiency efforts and investments in installations and processes that have a predictable ROI. But are these targets aligned with the long term goal to limit global warming to 2 degrees? And would more ambitious targets and strategies be more of an opportunity or a threat to businesses as they specify the degree to which their products and services contribute to sustainable (low carbon) transformation?

Why is it important?

Inevitably, stronger commitments from governments and increasing climate risks will have consequences for business not just in a country, but through value chain connections also across borders. Companies will have to align their climate and subsequently their business strategies taking into account not only new regulation and incentives but also emerging business opportunities on the way towards a decarbonized economy.

Goal(s)

What would a 2 degrees goal mean for companies? Are companies prepared and willing to take on the challenges that come with decarbonizing existing business models? How can they define and seize opportunities that lie in delivering services and products contributing to a decarbonized economy? The break-out session aims at bridging the gap between current climate/emission targets at company level and science based targets deducted from the 2 degrees goal: What would be the “right” targets and how can they be defined? How can companies identify and plan changes that are necessary and at the same time seize on opportunities as a consequence of new and probably much more ambitious targets?

Organizers: WWF Germany, CDP, Global Compact Network France, Caring for Climate

Speakers: Jean-Pierre Maugendre (SUEZ environnement),  Heidi Huusko (Caring for Climate), Susan Dreyer (CDP), Thomas Krick (Accenture), Ricarda Engelmeier (Siemens)

Moderator: Matthias Kopp (WWF)

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BO 06: Child Rights – The Business Perspective (Room Tallinn)

Child Rights – The Business Perspective (Room Tallinn)

Companies and children are connected in multiple ways – through working parents, as future employees, or as consumers – and companies can have impacts on children through numerous activities and at different stages of their supply chain. The corporate responsibility to respect children’s rights is contained in the UN Global Compact’s 10 principles and spelled out in the Children’s Rights and Business Principles. Corporate engagement to respect and promote the rights of children can make a difference for this particularly vulnerable group and contribute to a fair and sustainable development. In order to take effective action, however, it is essential to understand the nature of children’s rights as well as how they can most successfully be addressed through corporate strategies.

To this end, the break-out session aims at raising awareness for children’s rights from the business perspective and addresses the question of how child rights can be successfully incorporated into business practice through the presentation and discussion of company best practices.

Organizers: UNICEF, Save the Children, Global Compact Network Belgium

Speakers: Julia Olofsson (Ikea), Neel Gammelgard (Lego), Frances Goodwin (Lego), Ines Kämpfer (CCR CSR)

Moderator: Eija Hietavuo (UNICEF)

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BO 07: Business’ Contribution to Women’s Empowerment – Learning from Practice (Room Vilnius)

Business‘ Contributions to Women’s Empowerment – Learning from Practice (Room Vilnius)

Recent studies reconfirm: Fostering gender diversity and empowering women in the workplace, in the community, as suppliers and as customers helps business to perform better. In the past couple of years, women’s empowerment has therefore become an important element of many companies’ diversity, inclusion and sustainability strategies. The Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs), a partnership initiative of UN Women and the UN Global Compact, provide a framework and guidance for companies to integrate their goals in daily business practice. The G7 Joint Declaration in June and the Sustainable Development Goals to be adopted in September substantiate international expectations towards business’ contribution to women’s empowerment.

Participants of this break-out session will learn from existing best practice approaches by businesses to advancing gender equality. Subsequently, the participants and the speakers will jointly identify and discuss further opportunities for women’s empowerment in the work- and marketplace.

Organizers: Global Compact Network Croatia, UN Women National Committee Germany

Speakers: Bernhard Schwager (Bosch), Doris Fennes-Wagner (ORF), Martina Timmermann (TIMA GmbH)

Moderator: Henrike von Platen (Business Professional Women, BPW)

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BO 08: Corporate Sustainability: An Important Agenda for Boards of Directors (Room Moskau)

Corporate Sustainability: An Important Agenda for Boards of Directors #GC15Boards (Room Moskau)

What are we talking about?

In recent years the link between corporate sustainability issues and long-term business success has been established beyond serious doubt. At the same time, it became clear that sustainability has to be everybody’s business and not just the domain of CSR-managers. As a central pillar of corporate governance, the Board of Directors can and has to play a pivotal role in this respect.

Why is it important?

Board adoption and oversight of corporate sustainability, while on the rise in some respects, continues to represent an area of tremendous opportunity for most companies. By embedding sustainability within its core duties – notably setting the strategic course, managing and monitoring risk, leading executive recruitment, and determining remuneration – Directors are uniquely positioned to ensure the full mainstreaming of sustainability into business strategy and practices in a way that will support the long-term profitability and viability of the company.

Building on resources and experiences from the new Global Compact Board Programme this session aims to:

  • Clarify the business case for sustainability for board members responsible for oversight and advising the executive board on these matters
  • Provide examples for how Boards can play an important role in driving sustainability

Organizers: Local Network Italy, Global Compact LEAD

Speakers: Ingvild Sorensen (Global Compact LEAD), Craig Smith (INSEAD & Global Compact Board Programme facilitator), Marina Migliorato (Enel), Alessia Sabbatino (Global Compact Network Italy Foundation), Raffaella Bordogna (Eni), Thorsten Pinkepank (BASF)

Moderator: Helle Bank Jorgensen (Global Compact Canada & Global Compact Board Programme facilitator)

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17:00 – 17:10 Welcome Note

17:10 – 17:20 Impulse

Speaker: Kurt Bock, BASF SE

17:20 – 18:45 High Level Panel “The Future of the UN Global Compact”

The Future of the UN Global Compact #GC15Future

After 15 years the UN Global Compact has reached a scale and scope that puts it at a crossroads. At the same time, the Agenda 2030 for People, Planet, Prosperity, Peace and Partnership opens a new chapter for business involvement in sustainable development at the local, national and global level. The Global Compact has spearheaded the increasing role of businesses on the basis of the 10 Principles for years. Has it achieved its goal, now that the Agenda 2030 has been decided upon? A rhetorical question but one that every organization should be asked from time to time and be able to find convincing answers for.

The UN Global Compact is unique in its constitution. It is part of the UN but has a special governance structure, an unusual financing mechanism, a multi-stakeholder advisory board with the SG at its helm, a government group of supporting countries, a multiplicity of platforms, working groups and thematic initiatives and more than 80 local networks with a high degree of autonomy. The Compact operates in a landscape that is not short of organizations and important players such as the WBCSD, WEF, ICC, OECD, Unions, civil society organizations such as Transparency International and UN organizations such as UNICEF, UN Women etc., and national governments, some of those participating at the conference and represented on this panel.

With its fast experience in organizing multi-stakeholder partnerships and specific platforms for business engagement in sustainable development the UN Global Compact is uniquely positioned to drive the implementation of the Agenda 2030 through business. However, the challenges e.g. concerning governance, relationships with other organizations and within the UN system, financing, expectation management, etc. are significant.

Panel:

  • Lise Kingo (Executive Director, UN Global Compact)
  • Angel Pes (President Global Compact Network Spain, Subdirector General de La Caixa)
  • Wilfried Porth (Executive Board, Daimler AG)
  • Fiona Reynolds (Executive Director, UN PRI)
  • Cobus de Swardt (Managing Director, Transparency International)
  • Thomas Fitschen (Director for the UN, for international cooperation against terrorism and for cyber foreign policy at the Federal Foreign Office)

Moderator: Heino von Meyer (Director OECD Berlin Center)

19:00 – 21:00 Stand Up Dinner Reception

Dinner reception sponsored by Daimler_Logotype_CO_180px_tw

WEDNESDAY | 14 OCTOBER 2015

07:45 – 09:00 Breakfast Sessions (doors open 7:30)

BF1: Lawyers as Leaders in Driving Corporate Sustainability and Business Support for the Rule of Law (Room Minsk)

Lawyers as Leaders in Driving Corporate Sustainability and Business Support for the Rule of Law (Room Minsk)

In recent years there has been a growing consensus that lawyers have an important role to play in advancing corporate sustainability related issues by providing critical support at the board, c-suite and operational level. This session will showcase two key resources which serve to support lawyers in embracing this emerging role, namely: the Guide for General Counsel on Corporate Sustainability (Guide) and the Business for the Rule of Law Framework (Framework). These are complementary resources that provide practical guidance to lawyers and others in advising business to meet corporate sustainability goals. These goals include respect for universal principles and support for broader societal goals. Both resources are the result of extensive international consultation processes and desk research conducted over the past 18 months under the auspices of international advisory groups.

Why is it important?

During this session various speakers will explore how:

  • The Guide serves as a key resource for lawyers at all levels of engagement to understand what are some of the challenges and opportunities their colleagues are experiencing in addressing corporate sustainability issues
  • The Framework provides guidance on how businesses, typically through the office of the General Counsel, are able to support efforts to strengthen legal frameworks and accountable institutions as a complement not substitute for government action

These two companion resources provide a platform to start the conversation and promote action at the local level, whether this be through thematic roundtable discussions and/or a dedicated rule of law working group or similar.

Who should attend?

Business representatives (general counsel, company secretaries, chief compliance officers, chief sustainability officers or similar), law firms, legal professional associations and business associations, academia and representatives from Global Compact Local Networks.

Organizers: UN Global Compact, Baker & McKenzie, Linklaters

Speakers: Christopher Burkett (Baker & McKenzie), Daniela Seeliger (Linklaters LLP), Sir Mark Moody-Stuart (Global Compact Foundation), Ursula Wynhoven (United Nations Global Compact), Julianne Hughes-Jennett (Hogan Lovells), Ricardo Cortes-Monroy (Nestle), Michela Cocchi (Studio Legale), Avvocato Michela Cocchi (Studio Legale)

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BF2: Newest Trends in the European SRI-Market: Increasing Transparency through Labelling (Room Riga)

Newest Trends in the European SRI-Market: Increasing Transparency through Labelling (Room Riga)

Companies often see the collection of sustainability data for reporting and for analysts as a burden with questionable return. On the other hand, such information is crucial for investors that want to invest in sustainable businesses and projects. If finance is to play a bigger role in driving sustainability, decisions in SRI must be made easier and transparency must be improved. Labels based on Global Compact principles and improved communication can play a pivotal role in this respect.

The session will give a short overview of the European SRI-market and inform about newest trends in transparency and labelling of SRI-funds. Additionally, the session aims at fostering the mutual understanding between investors and companies being invested in.

Organizers: Forum Nachhaltige Geldanlagen e.V., Eurosif

Speakers: Sabine Pex, Forum Nachhaltige Geldanlagen e.V., NN Eurosif

BF3: Beyond CSR - Newest Trends in Social Innovation (Room Asgabat)

Beyond CSR – Newest Trends in Social Innovation

Larger companies often struggle to recognize societal needs and wants and translate them into viable business models. At the same time, there are an increasing number of often small scale innovators that explicitly address societal challenges. They come up with social innovations that are new or differentiated products and services that work towards solving societal goals or challenges, e.g. lack of access to energy, clean water, health services or communication. Social innovations often face severe obstacles from finance and capacity to capabilities and business case development. This leads to situations where promising ideas, projects, prototypes and business models are stuck without an obvious road towards upscaling.

Participants in the sessions will get insights into how selected models of scaling social innovations work and what role business, civil society and political actors can play in these processes. Using practical examples, they will learn how social innovations can address societal challenges and at the same time be developed into scalable business cases. Additionally, they will be introduced to a methodology that helps to relate a particular innovation to their own business context.

Organizers: The Do School, Bertelsmann Foundation, Global Compact Network Germany

Speakers: Julia Scheerer (Bertelsmann Foundation), Michael Norton (CIVA)

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08:00 – 09:15 Registration

09:15 – 10:45 High Level Panel “The Alliance for Integrity – Collective Action for Principle 10”

The Alliance for Integrity – Collective Action for Principle 10 #GC15AfIn

Collective action is essential, if we are to effectively reduce the risks of corruption over the long term. The fight against corruption calls for cooperation between all key stakeholders from the fields of government, civil society and the private sector. We can achieve more by working together, for example by sharing lessons learned and know-how, establishing best practices and building alliances. This is precisely the goal that the Alliance for Integrity (AfIn) has set itself.

Together with the main partners from the project’s pilot phase, the top experts on the multi-stakeholder panel will be addressing a number of questions, for example: How can we strengthen cooperation between the public and private sectors? Can the actors look beyond their own interests and contribute effectively to eliminating corruption through collective action?

The panelists

  • Tanja Gönner, Chair of the Management Board, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
  • Holger Lösch, Member of the Management Board, Federation of German Industries (BDI)
  • Dr. Philip Matthey, Chief Compliance Officer, MAN
  • Prof. Dr. Edda Müller, Chairwoman, Transparency International Germany
  • Maria Adomeit, Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Officer, Corruption and Economic Crime Branch (UNODC)

Moderator: Tanja Samrotzki

11:15 – 12:45 Break-Out Sessions

BO 09: Preventing Corruption in Supply Chain Management (Room Moskau)

Preventing Corruption in Supply Chain Management (Room Moskau)

While many large companies have changed their business model to include anti-corruption measures, compliance in the supply chain is still in its infancy. Smaller contractors face harsh competition and often prioritize on areas other than anti-corruption. In addition, members of the supply chain typically possess only limited financial and personnel resources. One way to overcome this problem is that companies learn from business partners, who already experienced advantages, challenges and drawbacks associated with corruption prevention programs. Trainings aim at raising awareness and building capacity among companies and their business partners. The ¡De empresas para empresas! program which has been developed by the German Global Compact Network and is now being implemented in the Mercosur region by the AHK Mercosur is being presented as a best practice example in this field.

Specific goal of the workshop is to stress the importance of compliance and anti-corruption measures as well as capacity development in this field within global supply chains.

Organizers: Alliance for Integrity (AfIn), Global Compact Network UK, German-Argentinean Chamber of Industry and Commerce (AHK Argentina), ICC Austria

Speakers: Dr. Maximilian Burger-Scheidlin (ICC Austria), Flavio Fuertes (Global Compact Network Argentina), Dorothea Garff (AHK Argentina), Dalma Susana Parisi (Siemens), Jo Webb (Sedex)

Moderation: Steve Kenzie (Global Compact Network UK)

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BO 10: Driving Corporate Human Rights Performance – Investor Expectations and Rankings (Room Tallinn)

Driving Corporate Human Rights Performance – Investor Expectations and Rankings (Room Tallinn)

For businesses knowing and showing how they respect human rights is a key element of social sustainability in line with the 10 Principles of the UN Global Compact and the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs). In recent years, awareness of these frameworks has grown in the investor community – and so have the expectations from ESG analysts, ratings and indices towards companies’ transparency and disclosure on how they identify and manage their most salient risks for negative human rights impacts. Businesses able to show how they proactively approach human rights due diligence can increase their appeal to potential investors, public and private clients.

During this break-out session sustainable investors and raters will present their views on this trend and how companies are responding. Moreover, the Corporate Human Rights Benchmark (CHRB) Initiative will be introduced and discussed. CHRB currently develops a methodology for a publicly available ranking of the top 500 globally listed companies based on their human rights policy, due diligence processes and actual performance.

Organizers: Business & Human Rights Resource Center (B&HRRC)

Speakers: Hendrik Garz (Sustainalytics), Phil Bloomer (B&HRRC), Jeanett Bergan (Kommunal Landspensjonskasse, KLP), Andrew Mason (Standard Life)

Moderator: Felicitas Weber (UNPRI)

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BO 11: Reporting Session 1: What to Report? Requirements: EU Directive, IIRC and SDG-Compass (Room Asgabat)

Reporting Session 1: What to Report? Requirements: EU Directive, IIRC and SDG-Compass (Room Asgabat)

Companies face the challenge to identify those sustainability issues they have a substantial impact on and that are relevant (material) for their business. Those are also the non-financial aspects that should be covered by the reports. The IIRC framework as well as the EU CSR directive provides some guidance on what to report. Whereas the IIRC provides a comprehensive reporting framework consisting of the capital model, a concept for assessing materiality and an overview of content elements, the EU CSR directive is at first glance quite straightforward, as it asks companies to prepare a non-financial statement containing the key CSR information. It should encompass at least environmental matters, social and employee-related issues, respect for human rights, anti-corruption and bribery. The statement is supposed to give a fair and comprehensive picture of their policies, outcomes, and risks concerning these issues.

The SDGs will add to these requirements as companies will have to account for their impact on key development challenges that are only partly covered by existing frameworks. A major challenge in this respect will be to translate the SDGs into a business context and to identify and clarify where businesses have impacts on SDGs and where and how they can contribute to the goals. The SDG-Compass project of the UN Global Compact, WBCSD and GRI addresses these challenges and aims at aligning existing requirements with the SDG and foster the integration of sustainable development thinking into strategy.

The session will discuss how the new requirements can enhance comprehensive corporate accountability with regard to the overreaching sustainability challenges as laid down in the SDGs and whether they have the potential to lead to more successful and sustainable business models.

Organizers: EnBW, econsense, Global Compact Network Germany

Speakers: Nicolas Bernier Abad (EU DG FISMA), Sven Morich (ASCG), Bastian Buck (Global Reporting Initiative), Jonathan Labrey (IIRC)

Moderators: Lothar Rieth (EnBW), Karsten Schröder (econsense)

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BO 12: How to Turn Ideas into Business Models and Scale Social Innovations? Good Practices Workshop (Room Vilnius)

How to Turn Ideas into Business Models and Scale Social Innovations? Good Practices Workshop (Room Vilnius)

Larger companies often struggle to recognize societal needs and wants and translate them into viable business models. At the same time, there are an increasing number of often small scale innovators that explicitly address societal challenges. They come up with social innovations that are new or differentiated products and services that work towards solving societal goals or challenges, e.g. lack of access to energy, clean water, health services or communication. Social innovations often face severe obstacles from finance and capacity to capabilities and business case development. This leads to situations where promising ideas, projects, prototypes and business models are stuck without an obvious road towards upscaling.

Participants in the sessions will get insights into how selected models of scaling social innovations work and what role business, civil society and political actors can play in these processes. Using practical examples, they will learn how social innovations can address societal challenges and at the same time be developed into scalable business cases. Additionally, they will be introduced to a methodology that helps to relate a particular innovation to their own business context.

Organizers: The Do School, Bertelsmann Foundation, Global Compact Network Germany

Moderators: Florian Hoffmann (Do School), Michael Norton (CIVA)

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12:45 – 14:15 Lunch Break & Marketplace

13:30 – 14:15 Global Compact Network Germany Assembly (only for German signatories of the UN Global Compact)

14:15 – 15:45 Break-Out Sessions

BO 13: Climate Session 2: Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Supply Chain – Materiality of Scope 3 Emissions and Climate Strategy 2.0? (Room Tallinn)

Climate Session 2: Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Supply Chain – Materiality of Scope 3 Emissions and Climate Strategy 2.0? (Room Tallinn)

What are we talking about?

Collecting, assessing and reporting of companies direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions (Scope 1 and 2) is increasingly state-of-the-art for many firms. However, when assessing the total GHG emissions related to companies’ business conduct, GHG emissions in the value chain (Scope 3) – upstream and downstream – become more and more important. In many industries, this is in line with a general shift from focusing only on responsibility that ends at the factory gate towards the management of business impacts on society and the environment along the whole value chain. Unfortunately, compared to measuring and managing Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions, identifying, prioritizing, measuring or estimating as well as influencing Scope 3 emissions is much more challenging for companies.

Why is it important?

For many companies, Scope 3 emissions outweigh Scope 1 and 2 emissions by far. Thus, despite the challenges with regard to their measurement and management, Scope 3 emissions are of enormous importance for understanding the materiality of emission sources, defining a climate protection strategy and setting effective reduction targets.

The break-out session aims at transferring knowledge on how to build the foundation for a reliable climate management through the integration and assessment of Scope 3 emissions. Inputs from experts will provide the basis for two roundtable discussions on specific Scope 3 issues. A short presentation of results and a final discussion will sum up the session.

Organizers: Global Compact Network France, CDP, WWF Germany

Speakers: Jan-Marten Krebs (sustainable), Susan Dreyer (CDP), Johannes Erhard (WWF)

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BO 14: Human Rights Due Diligence in Practice (Room Asgabat)

Human Rights Due Diligence in Practice (Room Asgabat)

Assessing and managing human rights impacts is a key element of corporate human rights due diligence and social sustainability in line with the Global Compact principles and the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. As part of the set-up of their human rights due diligence processes, companies have tested a diversity of ways to understand and assess their potential and actual human rights impacts. Limited information is available about how companies have implemented such assessments in practice, the role of internal and external stakeholders and how results have shaped company decision-making and the establishment of continuous human rights due diligence practices.

This break-out session seeks to foster mutual learning and open exchange between the participants. Business practitioners will share examples of human rights risk and impact assessment processes followed by an opportunity for in-depth discussions at parallel roundtables on future directions of corporate human rights due diligence. A short concluding discussion will help identify common challenges and lessons on this rapidly developing area of social sustainability.

Organizers: twentyfifty, Global Compact Network UK, Global Compact Network Germany

Speakers: Wolfram Heger (Daimler), Cecilie Hersleth (Telenor), Didier Terrolle (Sanofi), Tulika Bansal (The Danish Institute for Human Rights)

Moderator: Luke Wilde (twentyfifty)

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BO 15: Reporting Session 2: How to Report? Process for Effective and Efficient Reporting and Integrated Thinking (Room Moskau)

Reporting Session 2: How to Report? Process for Effective and Efficient Reporting and Integrated Thinking (Room Moskau)

Companies are more and more linking the contents of the financial and sustainability reports, reducing the size of reports and placing a special focus on explaining the performance of the company in a clear and comprehensible manner. This represents an important milestone on the path towards more concise, transparent and comprehensive reporting that meets new requirements as well as increased demands of stakeholders for more and better information.

As a major advancement from more traditional sustainability reporting, integrated reporting requires integrated thinking and management and can thus be a key driver for change in the organization. The implementation of the EU directive implies that companies have to publish information on sustainability such as social and environmental factors, with a view to identifying sustainability risks and increasing investor and consumer trust, preferably in the management report. The EU directive presumes that the disclosure of non-financial information helps companies measuring, monitoring and managing their business performance as well as their impact on society and the environment.

The session will highlight the crucial link between integrated thinking within the organization and integrated reporting as a condition to foster change towards sustainability goals and on the long run towards the SDGs. The focus will be on discussing the related management challenges and on good practice examples on how to turn those challenges into opportunities.

Organizers: EnBW, econsense, Global Compact Network Germany

Speakers: Charlotte Bengt (Novo Nordisk), Jean-Hugues Hermant (Veolia), Will Ritzrau (SAP), Christoph Dolderer (EnBW), Steffen Schwartz (ThyssenKrupp)

Moderators: Lothar Rieth (EnBW), Karsten Schröder (econsense)

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BO 16: Walk the Talk: Business Profit vs. Compliance Culture (Room Vilnius)

Walk the Talk: Business Profit vs. Compliance Culture (Room Vilnius)

Background & Goal

Compliance management systems are proliferating among companies across the world. In many European countries, however, compliance remains strongly focused on eliminating liability risks. This narrow focus on liability misses the main point of compliance: furthering clean and transparent business practices throughout the company. Business integrity is more than just a set of policies and procedures. The “tone from the top” is necessary, but equally important is that compliance trickles down to employees on the ground. Current cases underline the importance of a compliance culture in the company. A holistic approach to compliance integrates business integrity into the corporate culture and should be an integral part of corporate sustainability and responsibility.

The goal of the session is to showcase holistic approaches to compliance and their potential benefits for mitigating corruption risks. The discussion will highlight challenges as well as strategies for implementation throughout the organization. The pro & cons of the new ISO 19600 will be also discussed.

Who should attend?

Compliance officers and sustainability managers, legal counsel, managers responsible for corporate governance, representatives from government and other organizations wishing to further their understanding of a culture of compliance.

Organizers: Alliance for Integrity (AfIn), Global Compact Network Germany

Speakers: Peter Fissenewert (hww), Bartosz Makowicz (Europe University Viadrina), Christina Möller (Bertelsmann), Oskar Filipowski (KGHM)

Moderator: Noor Naqschbandi (AfIn)

⇒ More details

15:45 – 16:45 Wrap Up, Look Out & Fare Well

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